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I know the plans I have for you,” says the Lord; “plans for good and not for evil, to give you a future and a hope.”

the CULTIVATING

journal

Moroccan Sweet Potato and Squash Stew

September 22, 2018



I stumbled across this recipe in an international cookbook I had years ago. I was excited to try it out when we first moved to Kenya but found quickly that not all of the ingredients were always available in that part of the continent. So, over the years I have adjusted the recipe to match our location and resources, which honestly, gives it a uniquely “us” flavor to it. Our house helper and I have fun making it together and now, it’s become a favorite recipe of hers as well. I like to make it when we have international guests with us, as they often remark that the flavors are so robust and different. It’s been exciting to see if they can guess where the recipe originates from.

If you’re looking for a quick recipe that will transport your family to another culture after the first taste, then this is it! 

Serves 6-10  |  Prep Time: 30 mins  |  Cooking Time: 30 mins  |  Total Time: 1 hour 

 

Basic Ingredients:

6 Tbsp. Butter or olive oil 

2 medium white onions, chopped

4 Tbsp.+ minced garlic 

4 tsp.+ minced ginger

4 tsp. yellow curry powder

Dash of cumin

4 cups chicken or vegetable broth (can use low-sodium)

1- 1 1/2 large raw butternut squash, peeled & cubed

1 pound (6-8) raw white sweet potatoes, rinsed, peeled and chopped 

2 Tbsp. honey 

Salt and course, freshly ground black pepper to taste

Handful of cilantro to your liking

 

Spicing it Up

My kiddos have milder tongues so we omit these ingredients, but for a spicier, northern African flavor add: 

  • Pinch of cayenne pepper
  • Pinch of hot paprika

 

Hard to Find Ingredients:

Some of the ingredients this calls for can be hard to find at market so those listed above are regular substitutes. These are what it originally calls for: 

  • Yellow/Orange sweet potatoes 
  • Pinch of saffron

Instructions

Note 1: Before you start, if you’re unable to get pre-made broth and need to make it from scratch, do so before you start. Have it measured and ready to go. Also, prepare & measure out all ingredients beforehand as you’ll need to add them quickly during the process. 

Note 2 : This is a larger portioned recipe as we always make it from scratch. So, for all the work we do, we want it to cover a couple of meals. You can half the recipe for a single meal, or freeze the leftovers, since it freezes really well. 

In a medium sauté pan or skillet, melt the butter on medium-high heat until it’s foamy or the oil until it evenly spreads across the pan. Sauté the onions until softened, (3-4 minutes). Do not let it go longer or the onions will change flavor and start to burn. Immediately add the garlic, ginger, curry powder, (cayenne pepper, hot paprika for a spicier stew), and sauté until it’s fragrant (2-3 mins max). Next add the broth (& saffron if you have it on hand, you lucky devil, you) and bring to a boil. Lower the heat to medium, and next add the squash, sweet potatoes and honey. Sprinkle with salt and pepper. Stir all together. Cover and simmer on low, stirring on and off for about 20 minutes or until the vegetables are to your liking of tenderness. Test the seasoning and add salt, pepper, curry powder, or cayenne to taste. Finally top it off with a sprinkling of chopped cilantro. 

Vegetarian (if using vegetable broth), gluten-free 



Downloadable Recipe – pdf

MOROCCAN SWEET POTATO AND SQUASH STEW Recipe

Pahtyana Moore and her family make their home in Eastern Africa, where she is the Senior Editor for Moore Four Ministries – a ministry committed to equipping and mobilizing the Kenyan Church in discipleship and community engagement. She also lends her talents and expertise in editing, writing and design to Print for Africa – a Kenyan-based publishing house and serves as an International Correspondent to The Cultivating Project. She enjoys blogging about the complicated art of living life and making home abroad. You can find her most days writing or editing between boisterous bouts of scurrying monkeys out of her kitchen.

 

Pahtyana Moore

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